Learning Technologies of Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, 6860 Readings

Archive for the ‘Schools’ Category

Finnish School experimenting with Tablets

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Savonlinna University Practice School is a small elementary and middle school (grades one to nine) near one of the University of Eastern Finland’s campuses. The elementary and middle school is now playing a central role in the university’s educational research and experimentation. The school has specialised in the use of PC tablets in primary school. Kimmo Nyyssönen is the teacher in charge of coordinating these initiatives. The school already has years of experience in the use of tablets and now wants to find out if it can take things to a new level by discarding books altogether. Tablets have been in use in Finnish schools for a while, but we are the first school to use them extensively in several grades. We are also the first to try leaving traditional school books behind,” he says. They call their new project Future Classroom 2020.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 5, 2013 at 8:06 am

Posted in Schools, Tablets

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Facilitating Effective ICT-Pedagogy Integration Project

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ICT remains abysmally under-used by students and teachers in classrooms, and ICT-enabled student-centred teaching and learning approach finds no ground of pervasiveness within school systems, especially for developing countries. Three obstacles still remain in the way of teachers’ using ICT to its full potential toward enhancing student learning and improving the quality of education: 1) the lack of policy encouragement (especially at the school level), 2) the lack of knowledge on new pedagogy and techniques of integrating ICT in student-centred teaching and learning activities, and 3) the lack of long-standing professional support which further leads to teachers’ lack of confidence.

In response to these, UNESCO Bangkok implemented the “Facilitating Effective ICTPedagogy Integration Project” from January 2010 to March 2013 with the goal of creating an enabling environment that facilitate students’ direct and effective use of ICT for more meaningful and productive learning activities, with a specific focus on project-based tele-collaboration.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

April 22, 2013 at 10:31 am

Posted in ICT, Schooling, Schools

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If Steve Jobs Designed Schools

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What if Steve Jobs had re-invented the education system rather the computer and consumer electronics industry?

Steve Jobs was a contradictory character, combining control freak and Zen Buddhist, and technology with design. He had a revolutionary impact on computing, animation, the music industry, printing, and publishing. Last year he and Bill Gates together expressed surprise at how little impact technology had had on schools. Jobs’s wife is an educational reformer, he was a college dropout; but what would it have been like if Steve Jobs had focussed on education? What would the Jobs School be like?

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

February 24, 2012 at 3:00 pm

Posted in ICT, Schools

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Teachers Resist High-Tech Push in Schools

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Last year, the state legislature overwhelmingly passed a law that requires all high school students to take some online classes to graduate, and that the students and their teachers be given laptops or tablets. The idea was to establish Idaho’s schools as a high-tech vanguard.

To help pay for these programs, the state may have to shift tens of millions of dollars away from salaries for teachers and administrators. And the plan envisions a fundamental change in the role of teachers, making them less a lecturer at the front of the room and more of a guide helping students through lessons delivered on computers.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

January 4, 2012 at 11:47 pm

A Silicon Valley School That Doesn’t Compute

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The chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to a nine-classroom school here. So do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard.

But the school’s chief teaching tools are anything but high-tech: pens and paper, knitting needles and, occasionally, mud. Not a computer to be found. No screens at all. They are not allowed in the classroom, and the school even frowns on their use at home.

Schools nationwide have rushed to supply their classrooms with computers, and many policy makers say it is foolish to do otherwise. But the contrarian point of view can be found at the epicenter of the tech economy, where some parents and educators have a message: computers and schools don’t mix.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 10, 2011 at 11:56 am

Posted in Computers, Schooling, Schools

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Khan Academy

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The Khan Academy is an organization on a mission. We’re a not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere. All of the site’s resources are available to anyone. It doesn’t matter if you are a student, teacher, home-schooler, principal, adult returning to the classroom after 20 years, or a friendly alien just trying to get a leg up in earthly biology. The Khan Academy’s materials and resources are available to you completely free of charge.

Students can make use of our extensive video library, practice exercises, and assessments from any computer with access to the web.

  1. Complete custom self-paced learning tool
  2. A dynamic system for getting help
  3. A custom profile, points, and badges to measure progress

Coaches, parents, and teachers have unprecedented visibility into what their students are learning and doing on the Khan Academy.

  1. Ability to see any student in detail
  2. A real-time class report for all students
  3. Better intelligence for doing targeted interventions

Written by Giorgio Bertini

September 16, 2011 at 12:15 pm

Electronic education: Flipping the classroom

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Hopes that the internet can improve teaching may at last be bearing fruit.

TheE 12-year-olds filing into Courtney Cadwell’s classroom at Egan Junior High in Los Altos, a leafy suburb of Silicon Valley, each take a white MacBook from a trolley, log on to a website called KhanAcademy.org and begin doing maths exercises. They will not get a lecture from Ms Cadwell, because they have already viewed, at home, various lectures as video clips on KhanAcademy (given by Salman Khan, its founder). And Ms Cadwell, logged in as a “coach”, can see exactly who has watched which. This means that class time is now free for something else: one-on-one instruction by Ms Cadwell, or what used to be known as tutoring.

So Ms Cadwell, in her own web browser, pulls up a dashboard where KhanAcademy’s software presents, through the internet, the data the children are producing at that instant. She can view information for the entire class or any individual pupil. Just then she sees two fields, representing modules, turning from green to red, one for Andrea, the other for Asia. Ms Cadwell sees that Andrea is struggling with exponents, Asia with fractions. “Instead of having to guess where my students have gaps, I can see it, at that moment, and I walk over to that one student,” says Ms Cadwell, as she arrives at Asia’s chair.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

September 16, 2011 at 11:50 am

Schools see rising scores with iPads

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Educators say students who use the touch-screen devices for class appear to be more engaged in their studies. Students can view their school work anywhere and eMail their teachers anytime. It seems to be making a difference: Test scores of iPad-using students are climbing.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

May 17, 2011 at 12:58 am

Posted in iPad, Schools, Tablets

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