Learning Technologies of Change

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Archive for the ‘Teachers’ Category

Preferiria un mestre que en sabés de tot menys de tecnologies que no al revés

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Entrevista a Dolors Reig, psicòloga social i una de les veus més reputades sobre educació 2.0. Reig reivindica el paper del mestre com a orientador emmig de la revolució de les tecnologies, que assegura que ens portaran cap a una educació més participativa i collaborativa. Per Dolors Reig el desembarcament de les noves tecnologies en l’educació no és incompatible amb la reivindicació de la figura del mestre. Al contrari. En un entorn en què tot esdevé més immediat i on hi intervenen cada cop més fluxos d’informació, el professor és un far que orienta. No cal que sigui un expert en tecnologies de la informació i la comunicació (TIC), només que sigui suficientment obert de mentalitat com per incorporar-les amb l’ajuda dels seus alumnes.

llegir

Written by learningchange

12/03/2014 at 19:29

Posted in ICT, Teachers

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Twitter for Teachers

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Twitter may have started off as a fun social media site for keeping up with friends and sharing updates about daily life, but it’s become much more than that for many users over the past few years as the site has evolved and grown. These days, Twitter is a powerhouse for marketing, communication, business, and even education, letting people from around the world work together, share ideas, and gain exposure. It has become a staple at many online colleges and campuses as well, leaving many academics wondering just how and if they should be using Twitter both in the classroom and in their professional lives. So we’ve revised our original 2009 list to get you started or up to date. Whether you’re an academic or just interested in building your Twitter profile, keep reading to learn some tips and tricks that can help you take the first steps towards using Twitter for coursework, research, building a professional network, and beyond.

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Written by learningchange

18/10/2013 at 14:27

Posted in Teachers, Twitter

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Professional Learning of Higher Education Lecturers

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Higher Education is currently undergoing some of the most profound changes in its history. Against a backdrop of increasing marketization, rising levels of student debt and far greater fully online offerings, the higher education lecturer is grappling with new ways of working and high expectations of teaching quality. This 3 year qualitative study based in The Open University UK investigates the ways in which HE distance learning lecturers are approaching professional development and learning, identifying what type of learning may be most effective in creating and sustaining an online teaching identity. The study also examines ways in which resistance discourse is shaping these identities and practices revealing emerging re-conceptualisations of what it means to be an effective and well-motivated distance learning lecturer. The investigation uses a framework for identity analysis which analyses professional identity via the expression of hegemonies, phenomenological, narrative articulations of identity, and a post-modern, constructivist view of identity which is shaped by social interactions and communities of practice. It highlights the importance of personal agency in identity formation. The results revealed a number of insights into the ways in which a combination of resistance discourse, professional learning and reflections from student interactions are shaping new understandings of professional knowledge in this context.

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Written by learningchange

19/10/2012 at 10:40

30 Web 2.0 Tools for Teachers

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Earlier today I presented a short webinar about some of my favorite Web 2.0 tools for teachers. The webinar was on behalf of Ed Tech Teacher for whom I facilitate in-person workshops from time to time. This summer I’ll be working with them quite a bit. You can see the list of their summer workshops here. A recording of today’s webinar will be available here shortly. If you just want to know what tools I shared in the webinar, you can view the slides below.

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Written by learningchange

25/02/2012 at 16:00

Posted in ICT, Teachers, Web 2.0

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Personal Learning Networks for Educators: 10 Tips

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I often begin my workshop on personal learning networks (PLN) for educators by asking these questions: Who is in your learning network? Who do you learn from on a regular basis? Who do you turn to for your own professional development? Some educators are lucky enough to learn from their coworkers or colleagues at their site. Far too many others feel isolated in their room or office, and need to meet with counterparts from other sites in order to have a professional learning experience. All educators (and learners) can benefit from extending their own personal learning network online – beyond the walls of their schools, the boundaries of their districts, and the limits of their experience.

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Written by learningchange

06/02/2012 at 18:48

Posted in PLN, Teachers

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Teachers Resist High-Tech Push in Schools

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Last year, the state legislature overwhelmingly passed a law that requires all high school students to take some online classes to graduate, and that the students and their teachers be given laptops or tablets. The idea was to establish Idaho’s schools as a high-tech vanguard.

To help pay for these programs, the state may have to shift tens of millions of dollars away from salaries for teachers and administrators. And the plan envisions a fundamental change in the role of teachers, making them less a lecturer at the front of the room and more of a guide helping students through lessons delivered on computers.

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Written by learningchange

04/01/2012 at 23:47

Hyperconnected Education – the human network

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When people connect, they begin to share. This happens automatically, an expression of the instinctive human desire to communicate matters of importance. Sharing, driven by need, amplified by technology, reaches every one of us, through our network of connections. We both give and receive: from each according to their knowledge, to each, according to their need. Sharing has amplified the scope of our awareness. We can find and connect to others who share our interests, increasing our awareness of those interests.

We teach children to research, as if this were an activity distinct from the rest of our experience, when, in reality, research is the core activity of the 21st century. We need to think about the era, just a few years hence, when everyone has a very smart and very well connected mobile in hand from birth. We need to think about how that mobile becomes the lever which moves the child into knowledge. We need to think about our practice and how it is both undermined and amplified by the device and the network it represents.

Your students are not alone on their journey into knowledge and mastery. Beside them, educators blaze a new trail into a close connectivity, leveraging a depth of collective experience to accelerate the search for solutions. We must search and research and share and learn and put that learning into practice. We must do this continuously so we can stay in front of this transition, guiding it toward meaningful outcomes for both students and educators. We must reinvent education while hyperconnectivity reinvents us.

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Lawmakers Target Email, Texts Between Teachers and Students

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Missouri lawmakers are proposing a law that would prohibit teachers and students from having “exclusive contact” through email and on social networking sites such as Facebook.

State Sen. Jane Cunningham, a Republican from St. Louis, sponsored the
law and argued that she only wanted to limit “hidden communications”
between teachers and students that could not be monitored by third
parties, such as parents or school administrators.

Written by learningchange

20/09/2011 at 23:41

Posted in Students, Teachers

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Technology, Teachers and Training – Combining Theory with Experience

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Numerous developing countries are currently executing or planning—pouring both hope and money into projects that introduce technology into their educational systems. This paper puts forth the assertion that developing world ICT-in-education projects will continue to disappoint until they are reconceptualized and redesigned to incorporate three transformative concepts: teachers play the key role in determining the success or failure of such projects; change is a years-long process and not a one-time event; and teachers need ongoing support to adopt the technology and should be treated as stakeholders in the innovation-adoption process. In the Macedonian nationwide computers-in-schools project herein described, teachers received extremely comprehensive advance training in both computer use and methods of actively incorporating technology into their curriculum and teaching.  Still, the majority of teachers are not successfully employing technology in the classroom three years after the training and deployment were carried out. This paper applies the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (or  CBAM, which describes how individuals’ concerns evolve as they undergo the process of change and how these concerns may be addressed over time) to Macedonia’s experience. CBAM serves as a lens through which to examine ICT-in-education efforts and determine whether they effectively match up with how teachers experience change and where there is room for improvement in such efforts.

Written by learningchange

23/04/2011 at 14:44

Teacher Training on ICT Cannot Be a One-Time Event

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This means that the one-and-done format of training, which had been employed, was not going to be effective. We realized that training needed to be ongoing, addressing the teachers’ concerns and needs as they arose, and that they needed support throughout the years-long process of change (which they weren’t getting). Principals and other key school administrators had not expressly received relevant training, and did not understand their key role in supporting the teachers through the change process – and therefore, were not performing this role.

Written by learningchange

23/04/2011 at 14:28

Posted in ICT, Teachers, Training

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