Learning Technologies of Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, 6910 Readings

Crowdsourcing in the Humanitarian Network – An Analysis of the Literature

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The recent explosion of Internet technology enabled the world to be more and more connected. With such a new network, the possibilities of crowdsourced volunteer efforts rise during disasters. People from around the world can act as an emergency responder by fulfilling simple tasks, which in the mass have proven to be a valuable support to humanitarian aid agencies. The crowd can also just act as a sensor or social computer, where their real-time online reports in social media can contain useful information during a crisis. International organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank are increasingly joining crowdsourcing projects and seek support from upcoming Volunteer Technical Organizations (VTC), that perform crowdsourcing. Mostly the cost-efficiency and timeliness data delivery is fostering this new movement, which has its clear advantages over traditional efforts that generally need more time. A quick answer to a disaster is indispensable for emergency agencies. But for all that, challenges remain to be investigated. Accuracy, trust and security issues particularly hinder the adoption of crowdsourced data, although several solutions exist. This paper seeks to define the humanitarian aid crowdsourcing community, the associated projects and the challenges and chances that come with incorporating crowdsourced information in disaster response.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

December 12, 2014 at 1:33 pm

MicroMappers: Towards Next Generation Humanitarian Technology

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The MicroMappers platform has come a long way and still has a ways to go. Our vision for MicroMappers is simple: combine human computing (smart crowd-sourcing) with machine computing (artificial intelligence) to filter, fuse and map a variety of different data types such as text, photo, video and satellite/aerial imagery. Thanks to our Artificial Intelligence (AI) engine AIDR, the MicroMappers “Text Clicker” already combines human and machine computing. This means that tweets and text messages can be automatically filtered (classified) after some initial crowdsourced filtering. In response to Typhoon Ruby in the Philippines, we collaborated to explore how the MicroMappers “3W Clicker” might work. The result is the Google Spreadsheet below that is automatically updated every 15 minutes with the latest news reports that refer to one or more humanitarian organizations in the Philippines.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

December 12, 2014 at 1:11 pm

The Brain Guide to Understand the Future Internet

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What can the human brain and its relationship to the Internet tell us about our society, our technologies, and our businesses? A lot, as it turns out. The Internet today is a virtual replica of the brain, and the networks that leverage it grow and collapse in ways that are easily predictable if you understand the brain and other biological networks. Navigating the world of new technologies today can be like walking through a minefield unless you know the path. Imagine what you could do with a roadmap for where things are headed. In this fascinating look at the future of business and technology, neuroscientist and entrepreneur Jeff Stibel shows how the brain can act as a guide to understanding the future of the Internet and the constellation of businesses and technologies that run on it.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 20, 2014 at 1:45 pm

Posted in Brain, Internet, Networks

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What’s Our Vision for the Future of Learning?

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Educational institutions have to grasp that having enjoyed an historic monopoly as the go-to-guys for learning doesn’t mean they always will. As we gained control of our listening with the arrival of the mp3, so we will increasingly gain control of our learning, thanks to the arrival of MOOCS, social media and informal learning. We will want to determine whom we learn from, and with whom, at a time of our pleasing. Although this upheaval is currently taking place in tertiary education, schools are far from safe. As we find ourselves increasingly able to ‘hack’ our own education, I would expect, for instance, the homeschool market to expand rapidly. Once the possibility exists for students to study informally, at online (and offline) schools, compiling their own learning playlist, putting together units of study that appeal to their passions, the one-size-fits-all model of high school will appear alarmingly anachronistic. So, if educators want to keep their students engaged and inside their buildings, they have to look at the way they learn outside, and bring those characteristics inside.

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Read also: OPEN: How we’ll work, live and learning the future

Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 20, 2014 at 8:46 am

Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje y el Ecosistema Educativo en Red

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Nuestro interés en el tema de los Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje – PLE – no reside en el hecho de que sea un concepto radicalmente nuevo (en el primer capítulo de este libro afirmamos de hecho que se trata de una realidad inherente al aprendizaje de las personas y por lo mismo tan antiguo como ellas y su aprendizaje) o especialmente avanzado desde la perspectiva técnica o tecnológica; reside en que el planteamiento de esos entornos y sus ecologías sugieren asumir completamente un momento tecnológico y social concreto que tiene unas consecuencias ineludibles que marcan una gran diferencia en el ámbito de lo que conocemos como tecnología educativa. Desde nuestra perspectiva, el tema de los PLE es a la vez un punto de inflexión y un nodo de confluencia en toda la discusión y prácticas referidas a aprender con tecnología.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 20, 2014 at 7:56 am

Posted in PLE, PLN

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Search Engines for Academic Research

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Back in 2010, we shared with you 100 awesome search engines and research resources in our post: 100 Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars. It’s been an incredible resource, but now, it’s time for an update. Some services have moved on, others have been created, and we’ve found some new discoveries, too. Many of our original 100 are still going strong, but we’ve updated where necessary and added some of our new favorites, too. Check out our new, up-to-date collection to discover the very best search engine for finding the academic results you’re looking for.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 12, 2014 at 6:29 pm

How Google impacts the way Students Think

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It’s always revealing to watch learners research. When trying to understand complex questions often as part of multi-step projects, they often simply “Google it.” Why do people migrate? Google it. Where does inspiration come from? Google it. How do different cultures view humanity differently? Google it. Literally Google it. Type those questions word-for-word into the Google search box and hope for answers. Educators cringe, but to the students it makes sense. And if you think about it, this is actually helpful – a rare opportunity for transparency into the mind of a student. When your formative years are spent working your fingers through apps and iPads, smartphones and YouTube, the digital world and its habits can bend and shape not just how you access information, but how you conceptualize it entirely. You see information differently–something that’s always accessible. And you see knowledge as searchable, even though that’s not how it works.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 12, 2014 at 6:09 pm

Some recent Books on MOOCs

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1. MOOCs

In this volume Jonathan Haber offers an account of MOOCs that avoids both hype and doomsaying. Instead, he provides an engaging, straightforward explanation of a rare phenomenon: an education innovation that captures the imagination of the public while moving at the speed of an Internet startup. Haber explains the origins of MOOCs, what they consist of, the controversies surrounding them, and their possible future role in education.

2. Learning Technology for Education in Cloud: MOOC and Big Data

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Learning Technology for Education in Cloud, LTEC 2014, held in Santiago, Chile, in September 2014. The 20 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 31 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on MOOC for learning; learning technologies; learning in higher education; case study in learning.

3. College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students

In College (Un)bound, Jeffrey J. Selingo, editor at large of the Chronicle of Higher Education, argues that America’s higher education system is broken. The great credential race has turned universities into big business and fostered an environment where middle-tier colleges can command elite university-level tuition while concealing staggeringly low graduation rates, churning out graduates with few of the skills needed for a rapidly evolving job market.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 4, 2014 at 11:46 am

Posted in MOOC

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